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Celebration of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Yuwise Heroes. We celebrate the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
By:Admin
Date:Tuesday, January 15, 2019
Last Activity:Jan 17th
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 Our Hero

 

On Monday, January 19th.  2015,We celebrate the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

About Dr. King

Overview

Upbringing & Studies

The son of a minister, Martin Luther King, Jr. grows up to follow in his father’s footsteps; studying at Morehouse College, Crozer Theological Seminary, and earning a doctorate at Boston University’s School of Theology.

More
 

During the less than 13 years of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s leadership of the modern American Civil Rights Movement, from December, 1955 until April 4, 1968, African Americans achieved more genuine progress toward racial equality in America than the previous 350 years had produced. Dr. King is widely regarded as America’s pre-eminent advocate of nonviolence and one of the greatest nonviolent leaders in world history.

Drawing inspiration from both his Christian faith and the peaceful teachings of Mahatma Gandhi, Dr. King led a nonviolent movement in the late 1950’s and ‘60s to achieve legal equality for African-Americans in the United States. While others were advocating for freedom by “any means necessary,” including violence, Martin Luther King, Jr. used the power of words and acts of nonviolent resistance, such as protests, grassroots organizing, and civil disobedience to achieve seemingly-impossible goals. He went on to lead similar campaigns against poverty and international conflict, always maintaining fidelity to his principles that men and women everywhere, regardless of color or creed, are equal members of the human family.

Dr. King’s “I Have a Dream” speech, Nobel Peace Prize lecture and “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” are among the most revered orations and writings in the English language. His accomplishments are now taught to American children of all races, and his teachings are studied by scholars and students worldwide. He is the only non-president to have a national holiday dedicated in his honor, and is the only non-president memorialized on the Great Mall in the nation’s capitol. He is memorialized in hundreds of statues, parks, streets, squares, churches and other public facilities around the world as a leader whose teachings are increasingly-relevant to the progress of humankind.

Some of Dr. King’s most important achievements include:

  • In 1955, he was recruited to serve as spokesman for the Montgomery Bus Boycott, which was a campaign by the African-American population of Montgomery, Alabama to force integration of the city’s bus lines. After 381 days of nearly universal participation by citizens of the black community, many of whom had to walk miles to work each day as a result, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that racial segregation in transportation was unconstitutional.
  • In 1957, Dr. King was elected president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), an organization designed to provide new leadership for the now burgeoning civil rights movement. He would serve as head of the SCLC until his assassination in 1968, a period during which he would emerge as the most important social leader of the modern American civil rights movement.
  • In 1963, he led a coalition of numerous civil rights groups in a nonviolent campaign aimed at Birmingham, Alabama, which at the time was described as the “most segregated city in America.” The subsequent brutality of the city’s police, illustrated most vividly by television images of young blacks being assaulted by dogs and water hoses, led to a national outrage resulting in a push for unprecedented civil rights legislation. It was during this campaign that Dr. King drafted the “Letter from a Birmingham Jail,” the manifesto of Dr. King’s philosophy and tactics, which is today required-reading in universities worldwide.
  • Later in 1963, Dr. King was one of the driving forces behind the March for Jobs and Freedom, more commonly known as the “March on Washington,” which drew over a quarter-million people to the national mall. It was at this march that Dr. King delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech, which cemented his status as a social change leader and helped inspire the nation to act on civil rights. Dr. King was later named Time magazine’s “Man of the Year.”
  • In 1964, at 35 years old, Martin Luther King, Jr. became the youngest person to win the Nobel Peace Prize. His acceptance speech in Oslo is thought by many to be among the most powerful remarks ever delivered at the event, climaxing at one point with the oft-quoted phrase “I believe that unarmed truth and unconditional love will have the final word in reality. This is why right temporarily defeated is stronger than evil triumphant.”
  • Also in 1964, partly due to the March on Washington, Congress passed the landmark Civil Rights Act, essentially eliminating legalized racial segregation in the United States. The legislation made it illegal to discriminate against blacks or other minorities in hiring, public accommodations, education or transportation, areas which at the time were still very segregated in many places.
  • The next year, 1965, Congress went on to pass the Voting Rights Act, which was an equally-important set of laws that eliminated the remaining barriers to voting for African-Americans, who in some locales had been almost completely disenfranchised. This legislation resulted directly from the Selma to Montgomery, AL March for Voting Rights lead by Dr. King.
  • Between 1965 and 1968, Dr. King shifted his focus toward economic justice – which he highlighted by leading several campaigns in Chicago, Illinois – and international peace – which he championed by speaking out strongly against the Vietnam War. His work in these years culminated in the “Poor Peoples Campaign,” which was a broad effort to assemble a multiracial coalition of impoverished Americans who would advocate for economic change.
  • Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s less than thirteen years of nonviolent leadership ended abruptly and tragically on April 4th, 1968, when he was assassinated at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee. Dr. King’s body was returned to his hometown of Atlanta, Georgia, where his funeral ceremony was attended by high-level leaders of all races and political stripes.
  • Later in 1968, Dr. King’s wife, Mrs. Coretta Scott King, officially founded the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change, which she dedicated to being a “living memorial” aimed at continuing Dr. King’s work on important social ills around the world.

http://www.thekingcenter.org/about-dr-king

About Mrs. King

Coretta Scott King

Human Rights Activist and Leader 1927- 2006

Coretta Scott King was one of the most influential women leaders in our world. Prepared by her family, education, and personality for a life committed to social justice and peace, she entered the world stage in 1955 as wife of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and as a leading participant in the American Civil Rights Movement. Her remarkable partnership with Dr. King resulted not only in four children, who became dedicated to carrying forward their parent’s work, but also in a life devoted to the highest values of human dignity in service to social change. Mrs. King traveled throughout the world speaking out on behalf of racial and economic justice, women’s and children’s rights, gay and lesbian dignity, religious freedom, the needs of the poor and homeless, full-employment, health care, educational opportunities, nuclear disarmament and environmental justice. She lent her support to pro-democracy movements world-wide and consulted with many world leaders, including Corazon Aquino, Kenneth Kaunda, and Nelson Mandela.

Born and raised in Marion, Alabama, Coretta Scott graduated valedictorian from Lincoln High School. She received a B.A. in music and education from Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio, and then went on to study concert singing at Boston’s New England Conservatory of Music, where she earned a degree in voice and violin. While in Boston she met Martin Luther King, Jr. who was then studying for his doctorate in systematic theology at Boston University. They were married on June 18, 1953, and in September 1954 took up residence in Montgomery, Alabama, with Coretta Scott King assuming the many responsibilities of pastor’s wife at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. 

During Dr. King’s career, Mrs. King devoted most of her time to raising their four children: Yolanda Denise (1955), Martin Luther, III (1957), Dexter Scott (1961), and Bernice Albertine (1963). From the earliest days, however, she balanced mothering and Movement work, speaking before church, civic, college, fraternal and peace groups. She conceived and performed a series of favorably-reviewed Freedom Concerts which combined prose and poetry narration with musical selections and functioned as significant fundraisers for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, the direct action organization of which Dr. King served as first president. In 1957, she and Dr. King journeyed to Ghana to mark that country’s independence. In 1958, they spent a belated honeymoon in Mexico, where they observed first-hand the immense gulf between extreme wealth and extreme poverty. In 1959, Dr. and Mrs. King spent nearly a month in India on a pilgrimage to disciples and sites associated with Mahatma Gandhi. In 1964, she accompanied him to Oslo, Norway, where he received the Nobel Peace Prize. Even prior to her husband’s public stand against the Vietnam War in 1967, Mrs. King functioned as liaison to peace and justice organizations, and as mediator to public officials on behalf of the unheard.

After her husband’s assassination in 1968, Mrs. King founded and devoted great energy and commitment to building and developing programs for the Atlanta-based Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change as a living memorial to her husband’s life and dream. Situated in the Freedom Hall complex encircling Dr. King’s tomb, The King Center is today located inside of a 23-acre national historic park which includes his birth home, and which hosts over one million visitors a year.

As founding President, Chair, and Chief Executive Officer, she dedicated herself to providing local, national and international programs that have trained tens of thousands of people in Dr. King’s philosophy and methods; she guided the creation and housing of the largest archives of documents from the Civil Rights Movement; and, perhaps her greatest legacy after establishing The King Center itself, Mrs. King spearheaded the massive educational and lobbying campaign to establish Dr. King’s birthday as a national holiday. In 1983, an act of Congress instituted the Martin Luther King, Jr. Federal Holiday Commission, which she chaired for its duration. And in January 1986, Mrs. King oversaw the first legal holiday in honor of her husband–a holiday which has come to be celebrated by millions of people world-wide and, in some form, in over 100 countries.

Coretta Scott King tirelessly carried the message of nonviolence and the dream of the beloved community to almost every corner of our nation and globe. She led goodwill missions to many countries in Africa, Latin America, Europe and Asia. She spoke at many of history’s most massive peace and justice rallies. She served as a Women’s Strike for Peace delegate to the seventeen-nation Disarmament Conference in Geneva, Switzerland in 1962. She was the first woman to deliver the class day address at Harvard, and the first woman to preach at a statutory service at St. Paul’s Cathedral in London.

A life-long advocate of interracial coalitions, in 1974 Mrs. King formed a broad coalition of over 100 religious, labor, business, civil and women’s rights organizations dedicated to a national policy of full employment and equal economic opportunity, as Co-Chair of both the National Committee for Full Employment and the Full Employment Action Council. In 1983, she brought together more than 800 human rights organizations to form the Coalition of Conscience, sponsors of the 20th Anniversary March on Washington, until then the largest demonstration ever held in our nation’s capital. In 1987, she helped lead a national Mobilization Against Fear and Intimidation in Forsyth County, Georgia. In 1988, she re-convened the Coalition of Conscience for the 25th anniversary of the March on Washington. In preparation for the Reagan-Gorbachev talks, in 1988 she served as head of the U.S. delegation of Women for a Meaningful Summit in Athens, Greece; and in 1990, as the USSR was redefining itself, Mrs. King was co-convener of the Soviet-American Women’s Summit in Washington, DC.

In 1985 Mrs. King and three of her children, Yolanda, Martin III and Bernice were arrested at the South African embassy in Washington, DC, for protesting against apartheid. Her son, Dexter Scott King currently serves as Chairman of The Board of Directors. Her son Martin Luther King III served as The King Center’s President & CEO and her daughter Bernice as Secretary of the Board of Directors and as Chief Executive Officer of the King Center.

One of the most influential African-American leaders of her time, Mrs. King received honorary doctorates from over 60 colleges and universities; authored three books and a nationally-syndicated newspaper column; and served on and helped found dozens of organizations, including the Black Leadership Forum, the National Black Coalition for Voter Participation, and the Black Leadership Roundtable.

During her lifetime, Mrs. King dialogued with heads of state, including prime ministers and presidents, as well as participating in protests alongside rank and file working people of all races. She met with many great spiritual leaders, including Pope John Paul, the Dalai Lama, Dorothy Day, and Bishop Desmond Tutu. She witnessed the historic handshake between Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and Chairman Yassir Arafat at the signing of the Middle East Peace Accords. She stood with Nelson Mandela in Johannesburg when he became South Africa’s first democratically-elected president. A woman of wisdom, compassion and vision, Coretta Scott King tried to make ours a better world and, in the process, made history. 

Mrs. King died in 2006. A few days after her death, thousands of Atlantans stood in line in the pouring sleet to pay their respects to her at a viewing in Ebenezer Baptist Church. She is today interred alongside her husband in a memorial crypt in the reflecting pool of The King Center’s Freedom Hall Complex, visited by hundreds of thousands of people from all over the world year-round. The inscription on the crypt memorializing her life of service is from I Corinthians 13:13 –“And now abide faith, hope, love, these three; but the greatest of these is love.”

http://www.thekingcenter.org/about-mrs-king

National Archives and Records Administration

MARTIN LUTHER KING CLIP REEL

U.S. Information Agency. (1982 - 10/01/1999)

ARC Identifier 54547 / Local Identifier 306.9479. NINE SHORT STORIES ON MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR., ARE PACKAGED FOR FEBRUARY'S BLACK HISTORY MONTH. STORIES INCLUDE: KING HOLIDAY; MLK/WREATH-LAYING; JACKSON/ MLK; KING/CIVIL RIGHTS; REAGAN/KIDS; MLK BUST/ CAPITOL; ANDY YOUNG REFLECTS; MLK CELEBRATION/ ATLANTA; MLK CELEBRATION/ WASHINGTON, D.C.

This is a Documentary I produced with CAS (Cole, Anna, Sacha) for Warren Tech, about Martin Luther Kingâs influence on America. It was created for a high school National History Day competition, winning 1st at regionals for best high school group documentary. Also took 1st at the DAFFY high school film awards, for best documentary. Working on this project, I learned so much more than I ever knew about King from school text books. I contacted 3 great community leaders in Denver for interviews.Vern L. Howard, Chairman of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday Commision. Project Manager for the Martin Luther King Monument.Rev. James D. Peters Jr. Pastor of New Hope Baptist Church. Walked with King during the Civil Rights Movement.Silke Hansen, Retired from Community Relations Services, Justice Department. Was very involved with the Civil Rights Movement.

 

DJ AVINY
Representing New York City. Representing the Five Boroughs. Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, The Bronx, and Staten Island. Is Brooklyn In The House? A very diverse background but according to the rules he can only represent two countries. Representing Puerto Rico also he specializes in Reggaeton. Hip Hop, R&B, and House Music. He will stand up to anyone. With a deep library of Reggae, Soca, and Afrobeats. Remember the ole saying "if you make it in New York you can make it anywhere." Lived in Dubai for many years setting a new standard in the region. Can he speak Arabic and play some tunes from the United Arab Emirates?

DJ AZZIE RANKIN
Representing Jamaica and Virgin Islands. Selecta for Fyah Storm International fell in love with Reggae Music as a youth. Crowned North Florida Remix Champion. He has also been called the Juggling Machine because he is highly skilled at blending all types of genres into a musical masterpiece! Selecta Azzie Rankin and Fyah Storm International has been tried and tested and can defend di ting!

DJ MASSIVE
Representing The U.S Virgin Islands (St.Thomas, St. Croix, and St. John). Also representing Antigua and Barbuda. In this competition DJs can only represent a maximum of two countries! Although in this mix, it seems like five! Remember Daddy Friday? Eddie and The Movements, Jam Band, Imagination Brass and Seventeen Plus. And the hot Burning Flames from Antigua! The musical revolution of the 80s and 90s! The introduction of the drum machine and the electric drums and the power that came with it!

DJ MASTER E
Representing St. Maarten. Representing all of St. Maarten and uniting the Dutch and French! Representing Zouk and Kompa Music but DJ Master E is the type of DJ that knows the words to every Soca, Calypso, and Reggae song. If he remembers all these words and can sing too that should indicate something about his ability to defend himself. DJ Master E will keep you guessing. Is he gonna play Zouk and Kompa or something from the Dutch or Spanish arsenal. DJ Master E covers the entire Caribbean and represents its diverse culture very well.

DJ SAYERS
Representing Trinidad and Tobago. Soca and Calypso Music. Steel Pan and Carnival. Trinidad and Tobago has is a leader in the Caribbean and has set the pace decades ago, not just in entertainment but but in every area including sports and manufacturing. The creation of the steel pan and its music is the eigth wonder of the world.

DJ SMOOVE
Born in the United Kingdom with parents from Antigua and Dominica. But in this competition DJs can only represent a maximum of two countries! Representing The United Kingdom. Representing London and West London. Representing multiple genres played in the clubs and pubs from London to Birmingham. Representing also, the island of Dominica. Representing Bouyon, Cadence, and Zouk Music.

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